The Jamaica Inn, Launceston

Haunted hostelry details for The Jamaica Inn, Launceston

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The Jamaica Inn, Cornwall

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Bolventor

  • The building dates from 1789 as a posting station. Author, Daphne du Maurier, mentions it. She lived nearby in the 1930s. The Jamaica Inn is home to an old sailor ghost in a long sea-coat with a sou’wester. Witnesses see him sitting on a perimeter wall of the inn, with then disappearing into the road. Locals think he is a man who, an assailant took this person’s life, here many years ago. A photograph was taken recently by a man and his daughter in one room at the inn. It showed a man with a shaven head. This is how a convict would have appeared. He was dressed in ragged clothing. Other ghosts include a mother with child, a young murdered smuggler, with a pirate. On some nights, it is seemingly the sound of horses’ hooves with metal wheels. One may hear, on the cobbles in the courtyard. Many years ago, a stranger stood at the bar. He was enjoying a pint of beer. Locals called him outside, having left the half-finished ale on the bar. That was the last time anyone saw him alive. The next morning his corpse someone found on the bleak moor. However, the manner of his death and the identity of his assailant remain a mystery. Previous proprietors, upon hearing footsteps tramping along the passage to the bar, believe it is the dead man’s ghost returning to finish his drink. About one and a half miles to the south is Dozmary Pool. This is where the sword of King Arthur, Excalibur possibly interred. After Arthur’s death, Sir Bedivere took the sword to that pool on the king’s instructions. After three attempts to relinquish the sword, he finally managed to throw it into the lake. A hand and arm arose from below the surface, caught the sword. Then it vanished with it. That eerie pool exhibits ghostly manifestations. These include the ghost of Jan Tregeagle, a 17th century magistrate. As punishment for murdering his wife and children, his ghost manifests there every night. His task of retribution is to empty out the water with a cracked shell. Legend has it that a pack of ferocious hounds watch over him to ensure he does not make his escape.
  • The Jamaica Inn at Launceston

 

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